Singing superb fairy wren

 

“I want to sing like the birds sing, not worrying about who hears or what they think.”― Jalaluddin Rumi

singing fairy wren by Bridget Cameron 1

Oh… for the chorus of spring…🙂

 

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Red-rumped parrots

red rumped parrot 1 sfe smaller

male red-rumped parrot (Psephotus haematonotus)

I had a pair of red-rumped parrots fly up to me today and spend some time with me. I felt most honored. I just love their grace, colours and temperament 🙂 ❤

female red rumped parrot sfe by Bridget Cameron

female red-rumped parrot (Psephotus haematonotus)

I love galahs!

” When I look into the eyes of an animal, I do not see an animal. I see a living being. I see a friend. I feel a soul.”  Anthony Douglas Williams.

proud-cocky-sfe-by-brdget-cameron

The galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) also known as the rose-breasted cockatoo.

I heard a familiar  ‘wuaaaaaaawk’, and looked out my bedroom window and watched quietly as a couple of galahs rested in the tall blue gum tree in my front garden. They knew that I was there, and for a while quietly observed me :).

i-can-see-you-sfe-by-bridget-cameron

They apparently didn’t mind my intrusion and before long they continued with their antics, hanging upside down, feeding, playing and munching on wood.

superb-cocky-sfe-by-bridget-cameron

The term galah is derived from gilaa, a word found in Yuwaalaraay and neighbouring Aboriginal languages, and colloquially we call them ‘cockies’.

It was utterly captivating and delightful watching them and I felt most privileged and blessed as they had allowed me into their precious lives, and hearts. 🙂 ❤

Superb Fairy Wren (Malurus cyaneus)

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I’ve been trying to capture the image of one of these beautiful birds for such a long time, almost as long as my memory serves me. They are quite rare and to catch the  fleeting aqua/blue as they fly past is quite extraordinary. It is only the male fairy wrens that have the bright blue aqua plumage, and only when they are breeding. When they are not breeding, they take on the brown colours of the female wren, although parading a blue/purple tail.  Males are usually found with females, as they are socially monogamous. The females brown plumage support a blue tail and they have red feathers around the eyes.

AUSTRALIAN RESEARCHERS HAVE DISCOVERED that crafty fairy-wrens can understand and respond to the danger calls of other birds, suggesting that they have an advanced level of awareness about the world around them. For more information about this, please read this article at Australian Geographic.

Fairy-wrens eavesdrop to avert danger.

p.s. Most images of superb fairy wrens have been enhanced to a more cyan/blue colour, yet their plumage in reality is closer to the photograph that I have taken above. I hope you enjoy his image!  I most certainly do… :).