SUPERMOON: 14th Nov 2016

moon-rise-splendour-sfe-by-bridget-cameron

Moon rise splendour

Did you see the Supermoon last night? If not, you can catch it tonight!

A Supermoon means that the moon is at its closest point to the Earth during the lunar orbit, a term called perigree. It’s the biggest Supermoon to rise in almost 69 years, at approximately 18% larger than at its apogee, furthest point from the Earth.  In fact, the full moon won’t come this close to Earth again until Nov. 25, 2034.

supermmon-2-sfe

Supermoon 16/11/2016

supermoon-by-bridget-cameron-sfe

Misty Supermoon

Advertisements

Did you see the Total Eclipse of the Moon last night?

 

full eclipse by Bridget Cameron

TOTAL LUNAR ECLIPSE: 8/10/2014 (from 7:45-11:55 pm. Adelaide Time):  My photographic compilation of the lunar show! The evening started off cloudy, but fortunately the clouds dissipated and I managed to get some excellent shots!

Total lunar eclipses explained

The Moon does not have its own light, but shines because its surface reflects the Sun’s rays. A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth’s shadow blocks all the Sun’s light from directly reaching the Moon’s surface.

Lunar eclipse

Eclipses of the Moon happen when the Sun, Earth and Moon are aligned to form an almost or exact straight line. The technical term for this is syzygy, which comes from the Greek word for being paired together.

Why does the Moon look Red?

The Earth’s atmosphere, removes or blocks parts of the sunlight’s spectrum leaving only the longer wavelengths. Because of this, a totally eclipsed Moon usually looks red.

Eclipses in different colors

A lunar eclipse can also be yellow, orange, or brown in color. This is because different types of dust particles and clouds in the Earth’s atmosphere allow different wavelengths to reach the surface of the Moon.

Stages of a total lunar eclipse

A total lunar eclipse usually happens within a few hours. Totality can range anywhere from a few seconds to about 100 minutes.

There are 7 stages of a total lunar eclipse:

  • Penumbral eclipse begins: This begins when the penumbral part of Earth’s shadow starts moving over the Moon. This phase is not easily seen by the naked eye.
  • Partial eclipse begins: The Earth’s umbra starts covering the Moon, making the eclipse more visible.
  • Total eclipse begins: Earth’s umbra completely covers the Moon and the Moon is red, brown or yellow in color.
  • Maximum eclipse: This is the middle of the total eclipse.
  • Total eclipse ends: At this stage, the Earth’s umbra starts moving away from the Moon’s surface.
  • Partial eclipse ends: The Earth’s umbra completely leaves the Moon’s surface.
  • Penumbral eclipse ends: At this point the eclipse ends and the Earth’s shadow completely moves away from the Moon.

For more information about Total Lunar Eclipses click here: http://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/total-lunar-eclipse.html

Image

Earth Horizon

This is a new painting I did to go with my poem,

At night, when the sea cradles the womb of the land.

Earth Horizon

 At night, when the sea cradles the womb of the land,
rippling liquid rainbows upon the sand,
I lie back on the dunes and look up at the moon,
moving from horizon to its zenith all too soon.
I hear the hush of the sea, its murmurs and swells,
and hear its rumbling, moving waves crashing like bells.
I feel the earth pulsing beneath me,
I feel the sea moving within me,
As I watch the stars above twinkle,
in a space-time distorted wrinkle,
Upon our Galactic home, Earth,
She is our hearth!

© 2014 Bridget Cameron

Some things I love

Some things I love

This compilation, is a snapshot of some of my Art. It moves between Australian Summer bushland, an Egyptian waterlilly and watery reflections, to fractal blossoms, butterflies, starry dolphins and children; to the strength of a dragon and a lion. The photo at the bottom left corner is me at one of my children’s fantasy workshops, where a small boy is being sprinkled with fairy dust… I hope you enjoy 🙂

HOW DO I CREATE? My creative process.

Image

GALACTIC CONCEPTION

I was asked this question by my dear friend Eiry Rees Thomas, author of The Flitwits http://theflitwits.com/author/eiry/. She wanted to know how I created, my exact creative process, and thought that my answer would be good for others to know also.

So here’s my response… Generally my images are spontaneous, that is, I feel moved to create and create from my imagination. Other times, I sit on something that caught my imagination, and I think about it, feel it, and sometimes use other sources of references to fine tune my ultimate creation.  I read a lot and assimilate as I go, never knowing when some seeds may be sprouted. Quite often images come to me when I look at the moon, and I future creations, then I dream more about it, and when the time is ripe, ‘out it pops!’

My writings are like that too, especially my poetry, which generally pops out as I’m writing it, yet was formed already in my dream state prior to its manifestation. With longer writings, I use this same spontaneous process, but dream, research and think a lot about it, before I write. At times it needs no editing, it just flows out perfectly, and other times, editing is needed to give it a more sound structure or to make it flow/ sound better.  I like to read it aloud, to hear inconsistencies, as music and rhythm is important. Some works need quite a lot of editing, in order to remove the superfIuous and/or inauthentic tones.

It is important to be critical of one’s work, in order to improve it. However, knowing when to stop analysing and critiquing is essential, as it can really dampen the process; take the joy out of it, and lead to more mistakes, that need to be rectified, leading down a spiral of more corrections. I do this sometimes, when I am too much in my ‘head’ or tired or in lots of pain. Knowing when to stop, is essential to the path of any writer/creator, as I don’t think we should take the joy out of our creations. Acceptance and letting go are part of that process too.

In a nutshell: Trust in ‘self’ and the creative process!

Happy creating!  Bridget Cameron :).

Image

AT NIGHT, WHEN THE SEA CRADLES THE WOMB OF THE LAND

night set sea by Bridget Cameron

At night, when the sea cradles the womb of the land,
rippling liquid rainbows upon the sand,
I lie back on the dunes and look up at the moon,
moving from horizon to its zenith all too soon.
I hear the hush of the sea, its murmurs and swells,
and hear its rumbling, moving waves crashing like bells.
I feel the earth pulsing beneath me,
I feel the sea moving within me,
As I watch the stars above twinkle,
in a space-time distorted wrinkle,
Upon our Galactic home, Earth,
She is our hearth!

© 2014 Bridget Cameron

BLUE MOON

BLUE MOON

DID YOU SEE THE BLUE MOON TONIGHT?

Blue Moon,
oh so rare,
give us flights of fancy tonight!

© Bridget Cameron